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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/1703

Title: Defying the "Destructives": Confederate Disaffection and Disloyalty in North Carolina's Northwestern Foothills, 1861-1865
Authors: Porter, Douglas R. Jr.
Advisors: Dr. Susanna Lee, Committee Chair
Dr. Holly Brewer, Committee Member
Dr. Craig Friend, Committee Member
Keywords: Unionism
William Woods Holden
Pro-Union
Peace Movement
Heroes of America
Red Strings
anti-secession
Confederate disaffection
Confederate disloyalty
Civil War North Carolina
North Carolina homefront
Issue Date: 16-Apr-2007
Degree: MA
Discipline: History
Abstract: This thesis considers Confederate disaffection and disloyalty in North Carolina's northwestern foothills; particularly Forsyth, Stokes, Surry, Yadkin, and Wilkes Counties. In so doing, this thesis adds to a growing collection of social histories and community studies that question Southern loyalties during the Civil War, and suggest that social, religious, and political factors, as well as war weariness contributed to anti-Confederate thought and behavior. Prewar Unionism and overwhelming opposition to secession before mid-April 1861 prevented the foothill counties from wholly devoting themselves to the Confederacy. Consequently, uncommitted foothill citizens rejected the Confederacy once faced with the Richmond government's unpopular wartime measures. Relentless hardships on the homefront additionally deepened regional dissatisfaction. In reaction, the foothill's disaffected population viewed the Confederate national government and North Carolina's original secessionists who encouraged the war as their primary enemies. In response, the region's anti-Confederates disloyally rebelled against the Richmond government, North Carolina's pro-war politicians, and the Southern war effort from April 1862 until the end of the war.
URI: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/1703
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