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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/1849

Title: A Simplified Visible/Near-Infrared Spectrophotometric Approach to Blood Typing for Automated Transfusion Safety
Authors: Anthony, Steven R
Advisors: Dr. Ashok Gopalarathnam, Committee Member
Dr. Kara J. Peters, Committee Member
Dr. M.K. Ramasubramanian, Committee Chair
Keywords: LED
spectrophotometric
spectroscopic
blood typing
IRED
Issue Date: 2-May-2005
Degree: MS
Discipline: Mechanical Engineering
Abstract: A new technique has recently been introduced for objectively quantifying the agglutination of red blood cells in a blood typing procedure using ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy. The technique involves analyzing the spectra of red blood cell suspensions in saline between the 665 nm and 1000 nm range, where the relative slope between a control and antibody treated sample are entered into a simple algorithm to form a so called agglutination index (A.I.). The proposal of this research is to simplify the detection method by replacing the spectral imaging of the diode array spectrophotometer with a discrete series of LED and photodiode pairs within the wavelength range of interest, in the forward scattering direction. The scattering theory involved in this phenomenon is investigated, and a simplified experimental sensor is designed and evaluated. The resulting experimentation shows a significant recreation of the spectrophotometer results by the simplified design with a promising potential for improvement. Optoelectronic design considerations are discussed for maximizing the sensitivity of this technique for use in a cost effective, automated device for transfusion safety.
URI: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/1849
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