An Integrated Spatial and Attribute Data Structure to Support National Park Service Management.

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dc.contributor.advisor Dr. James Gregory , Committee Member en_US
dc.contributor.advisor Dr. Hugh A. Devine, Committee Chair en_US
dc.contributor.advisor Dr. Stacey Nelson, Committee Member en_US
dc.contributor.author Colson, Thomas Payton en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-04-02T18:03:40Z
dc.date.available 2010-04-02T18:03:40Z
dc.date.issued 2005-03-17 en_US
dc.identifier.other etd-03162005-214214 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/1390
dc.description.abstract The National Park Service (NPS) maintains and supports various databases relevant to its mission. These include archeological sites, cultural objects, and exotic species inventories, to name a few. Data associated with each of these domains forms the basis on which NPS policy is formulated. However these databases often exist in independently maintained systems, often at different locations. Additionally these domains often contain spatial data in which data objects can possess spatial characteristics and location information. Currently most National Park Service non spatial attribute databases (e.g. ASMIS, CLAIMS, FMSS, and LCS) are centralized at regional or national headquarters, whereas most spatial information is generally created and maintained at the park. It is left to the data user to connect to these data entities, and this is at best cumbersome and at times, impossible. This project is a feasibility study that analyzes the use of GIS to integrate of park service attribute databases with locally collected park spatial data. The core procedure focuses on the application of computer aided software engineering tools to National Park Service GIS database design. This includes modeling database relationships and generating the database schema. The resultant prototype database was tested in two National Parks, Valley Forge National Historic Park and Appomattox Court House National Historic Park. In both instances, locally generated spatial data were imported successfully into a standardized ESRI geodatabase and integrated with other enterprise, non local data through the use of reusable objects. en_US
dc.rights I hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to NC State University or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report. en_US
dc.subject national parks en_US
dc.subject GIS en_US
dc.subject spatial database en_US
dc.subject database design en_US
dc.title An Integrated Spatial and Attribute Data Structure to Support National Park Service Management. en_US
dc.degree.name MS en_US
dc.degree.level thesis en_US
dc.degree.discipline Natural Resources en_US


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