Electronic Monitoring Relevance and Justification: Implications for Procedural Justice and Satisfaction

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Title: Electronic Monitoring Relevance and Justification: Implications for Procedural Justice and Satisfaction
Author: Watson, Aaron Michael
Advisors: Dr. Bart Craig, Committee Member
Dr. Joan Michael, Committee Co-Chair
Dr. Lori Foster Thompson, Committee Co-Chair
Abstract: The current study investigated whether reactions to electronic monitoring and task satisfaction are a function of the task-relatedness of monitoring practices and the presence of justification for monitoring. A sample of 176 undergraduate participants completed a computer-based task correcting electronic retail order forms. Participants were randomly assigned to one of five conditions: task-specfic monitoring with justification, task-specific monitoring without justification, off-task inclusive monitoring with justification, off-task inclusive monitoring without justification, or no monitoring. Task-specific monitoring involved electronic tracking of computer activities directly related to task performance, whereas off-task inclusive monitoring supposedly tracked nontask-related computer activities. Justification entailed providing a rationale or explanation for why monitoring was being implemented. The following dependent variables were assessed: perceived relevance of monitoring, perceived rationale for monitoring, invasion of privacy, procedural justice, and task satisfaction. Results indicated task-relatedness of monitoring and justification had an effect such that monitoring task-specific behaviors and providing a clear justification for monitoring resulted in relatively favorable attitudinal outcomes. Implications and recommendations for practice are discussed.
Date: 2008-03-30
Degree: MS
Discipline: Psychology
URI: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/1547


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