Computer-Assisted Instruction Versus Traditional Classroom Instruction: Examining Students' Factoring Ability in High School Algebra One

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Title: Computer-Assisted Instruction Versus Traditional Classroom Instruction: Examining Students' Factoring Ability in High School Algebra One
Author: Clinkscales, Michael John
Advisors: Karen F. Hollebrands, Committee Chair
John R. Kolb, Committee Member
Mohan S. Putcha, Committee Member
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to examine the effectiveness of computer-assisted instruction compared to the traditional instruction of a classroom teacher in mathematics. The results of the study are based a series of tests administered to two classes of Algebra I students. The test scores are used to analyze the achievement each class demonstrated through the tests. The study also examines the perceptions of students' experiences using computer-assisted instruction and its ability to meet their educational needs. The study uses two randomized classes in a high school setting. The two classes are Algebra I classes dealing with factoring polynomial expressions. The control group received traditional classroom instruction on factoring. The experimental group received instruction from an on-line learning system, called NovaNET. Both classes had equal number of students (n = 25) and were given their respective instruction during the same time period. The experimental group participated in a group discussion at the end of the study to relate their experience with computer-assisted instruction. A two-sample t-test was used to determine that there was no significant difference between the two forms of instruction. The students also did not show any significant difference in retaining the information taught. These analyses were determined from a posttest and retention test administered during the research period. Another analysis was performed on individual concepts learned during factoring. The item analysis of the posttest showed inconclusive data. During the discussion, the students' comments leaned toward favoring a more traditional classroom environment. Some students did recognize the power of the computer and suggested that both forms of instruction be integrated. Overall, the results suggest that there is no significant difference between the two methods of teaching. Both methods have positive features that bring the best out of instruction. It is recommended that continued research be done on computer-assisted instruction and comparing its methods with that of traditional instruction.
Date: 2002-11-13
Degree: MS
Discipline: Mathematics Education
URI: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/1850


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