Predicting Retention of Recent College Graduates in Science and Engineering: Implications for States and Organizational Recruiting Practices

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Title: Predicting Retention of Recent College Graduates in Science and Engineering: Implications for States and Organizational Recruiting Practices
Author: Tarant, Stephanie Ann
Advisors: Denis Gray, Co-Chair
Bert Westbrook, Co-Chair
Cathy Zimmer, Member
Mark Wilson, Member
Abstract: Today's labor force is more mobile than any cohort in recent history. Labor force mobility and state level retention can have profound effects on the economy of a state. It is necessary for organizations to both effectively retain their own talent as well as to attract top talent from other states. Understanding the individual level factors that predict who will move and who will stay in-state after graduating from college is important for policy makers and organizations looking to tailor their recruiting efforts in order to maximize their efforts to attract and retain top talent in science and engineering fields. The present study examined data collected by the National Science Foundation in their National Survey of Recent College Graduates (NSRCG:1997) to determine factors that predict state retention of high school and most recent college degree recipients in science and engineering fields. Logistic regression was used to analyze two dichotomous dependent measures of retention, high school degree and most recent college degree. Results found support for a core set of predictors common to both measures; they include race, college major, annual salary, and stayers (those who stayed in-state to attend college). In addition, undergraduate GPA predicted retention at the high school level while respondent age and citizenship predicted retention/ most recent degree. By far, stayers had the largest effect on retention for both dependent measures.
Date: 2002-04-02
Degree: MS
Discipline: Psychology
URI: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/216


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