An Investigation of Research Partnerships between Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Predominantly White Institutions

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Title: An Investigation of Research Partnerships between Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Predominantly White Institutions
Author: Lloyd, Andrea N. E.
Advisors: Frank J. Smith, Committee Member
Denis O. Gray, Committee Chair
Pamela P. Martin, Committee Member
Abstract: The creation of collaborative partnerships between historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and predominantly white institutions (PWIs) is regarded as a very promising mechanism for strengthening the educational pipeline for student populations that are underrepresented in research fields of study and for strengthening the research infrastructure of HBCUs. In spite of the growing popularity of HBCU-PWI research partnerships, there is virtually no data on the characteristics of these partnerships and the factors that affect partnership outcomes. The current research sampled a population of HBCU-PWI partnership principle investigators (HBCU PIs, n=8; PWI PIs, n=8). For the purposes of comparative analyses, a sample of PWI-PWI partnership PIs (n=10) also was obtained. Partnership PIs responded to forced-choice and open-ended items during a structured interview. Based on their responses, the major characteristics of these partnerships are described, and comparisons are made between the PI groups. Regression analyses were performed to determine which factors predict partnership outcomes, including satisfaction with the partnership process and project outcomes, perceptions of partnership success, and PI willingness to participate in similar partnerships in the future. Qualitative analyses of responses to open-ended interview items were also conducted. Study results indicate that PIs of HBCU-PWI partnerships regard their partnerships as successful and are satisfied with project outcomes and partnership processes. Furthermore, the data show that HBCU-PWI partnerships have goals that are more focused on the research training underrepresented groups than do PWI-PWI partnerships. The extent to which university resources were allotted for PIs' participation in their partnerships, PI perceptions of partner capability, the location of face-to-face meetings, and the number of partners involved were found to predict some partnership outcomes. Implications for partnership strategy and public policy are also discussed.
Date: 2007-12-07
Degree: MS
Discipline: Psychology
URI: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/253


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