It's an honorable choice: Rebellions Against Southern Honor in William Styron's The Confessions of Nat Turner

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dc.contributor.advisor Dr. Allen Stein, Committee Member en_US
dc.contributor.advisor Dr. Anne Baker, Committee Member en_US
dc.contributor.advisor Dr. Michael Grimwood, Committee Chair en_US
dc.contributor.author Harrell, Laura Allison en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-04-02T18:15:55Z
dc.date.available 2010-04-02T18:15:55Z
dc.date.issued 2009-12-04 en_US
dc.identifier.other etd-11052009-205004 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/2614
dc.description.abstract When Bertram Wyatt-Brown published Southern Honor: Ethics and Behavior in the Old South in 1982, he established honor as a key to understanding the culture, of the antebellum South, and created a new anthropological framework for analyzing Southern patterns of conduct. This essay describes, through the lens of honor, the attempts of Nat Turner and Margaret Whitehead to rebel against the patriarchal code of Southern honor, and explores their failures to subvert the rigid assumptions of the prevailing system. Disrespected, mistreated, and enslaved, Nat wishes to disrupt the perpetual social system of white honor and black deference; he uses his literacy and the patriarchal models of the Old Testament and his father to rebel against his social condition and to sustain his plan for insurrection and eventual liberation. Emotionally distant from the patriarchal authority of her brother and the influence of her mother, unable to communicate freely with her peers or family, and distraught and torn by her socially unacceptable belief that slavery should be abolished, Margaret rebels against these socially imposed controls and ideologically commits herself to her convictions about equality, tolerance, and Christian love. Though both Nat and Margaret actively rebel against the existing honor system, they fail to consider the influence of the public sphere. This failure to identify the public perceptions of various social communities results in the collapse of Nat’s and Margaret’s rebellions, and it contributes to their eventual deaths. en_US
dc.rights I hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dis sertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to NC State University or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report. en_US
dc.subject southern literature en_US
dc.subject southern honor en_US
dc.subject honor en_US
dc.subject virginia en_US
dc.subject nat turner en_US
dc.subject william styron en_US
dc.title It's an honorable choice: Rebellions Against Southern Honor in William Styron's The Confessions of Nat Turner en_US
dc.degree.name MA en_US
dc.degree.level thesis en_US
dc.degree.discipline English en_US


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