Analysis of the Factors Involved in Technological Problem Solving in a College Technology Education Classroom

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Title: Analysis of the Factors Involved in Technological Problem Solving in a College Technology Education Classroom
Author: Burt, Katrina Gabour
Advisors: Dr. Robert E. Wenig, Committee Member
Dr. John M. Pettitt, Committee Member
Dr. V. William DeLuca, Committee Member
Dr. Richard E. Peterson, Committee Chair
Abstract: The purpose of the study was to contribute to the goal of technological literacy by advancing the knowledge base of technological problem solving. The objective of the study was to examine the relationships between the following factors: technological problem solving potential, problem solving confidence, knowledge of a Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) problem solving process, psychological type, problem solving approach, Grade Point Average (GPA), problem-specific interest, problem-specific motivation, desire to solve problems, and desire to learn about problem solving. The study utilized the pre-experimental design method of one group pretest-posttest design and was conducted at North Carolina State University (NCSU) with sixteen students over a three-day, three-hour-per-day, workshop. Data collection instruments included Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, Problem Solving Inventory (PSI), and other researcher-prepared forms. Pretest and posttest real world problems were given along with a problem solving process intervention. JMP statistical analysis software (SAS Institute) was used to calculate Pearson product-moment correlations, Spearman rank correlations, t-tests, Fisher's exact test, Signed rank test, and Least Squares Fit with alpha set to 0.05. Pretest to posttest findings suggest a decrease in mean confidence, an increase in mean potential scores, a negative linear relationship for process scores, an association for desire to learn about problem solving (decrease), and no difference in mean problem solving approach scores. Pretest findings suggest a reverse linear relationship between confidence and potential scores, a reverse linear relationship between confidence and GPA, a positive linear relationship between process scores and potential scores, a positive correlation between potential scores and problem-specific interest, a positive correlation between process scores and problem-specific interest, a difference in mean potential scores for liking to solve problems (reverse relationship), and a difference in mean confidence scores for liking to solve problems. Posttest findings suggest a difference in mean potential scores for MBTI preferences of [J and P], a difference in mean confidence scores for MBTI preferences of [E and I], and a positive linear relationship between process scores and potential scores.
Date: 2005-04-19
Degree: EdD
Discipline: Math, Science and Technology Education
URI: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/3158


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