The Relationship Between North Carolina Middle School Academic Growth And The Implementation Level Of Key Middle School Practices: A Study For Middle School Decision Makers

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dc.contributor.advisor Dr. Kenneth Brinson, Jnr., Committee Chair en_US
dc.contributor.author Williams, Judith Lynn en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-04-02T18:34:14Z
dc.date.available 2010-04-02T18:34:14Z
dc.date.issued 2005-04-08 en_US
dc.identifier.other etd-03202005-113038 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/3668
dc.description.abstract Without hard data on the impact on student academic achievement, decision-makers are wary of fully implementing key middle school practices. To provide hard data for middle school decision-makers, this study was conducted. The aim of this study was to provide an accurate description of the status of middle schools in the state of North Carolina and to determine the relationship that exists between the degree of implementation of key middle school practices and student academic growth when controlling for school location, school size, student body race/ethnicity, and student body socioeconomic status. Study findings revealed that North Carolina middle schools with grade configurations 5-8 or 6-8 that participated in this study are implementing many of the key middle school practices as outlined in middle school literature and the majority of the participating schools indicated that they have been implementing key middle school practices over five years. In addition, two findings were identified by statistical analyses. First, analyses indicated that the implementation level and the number of years a North Carolina middle school met expected academic growth was not statistically significant. The second finding was that the degree of implementation of key middle school practices was a predictor of expected academic growth for one of the years in this study. Although other programs for that school year might have played into the North Carolina middle schools expected academic growth rates, this finding is relevant to North Carolina middle school decision makers. One year of testing data can be explored to see what key middle school practices were implemented that led to the increase of student academic achievement. en_US
dc.rights I hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to NC State University or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report. en_US
dc.subject key middle school practices en_US
dc.subject academic achievement en_US
dc.subject middle schools en_US
dc.subject education en_US
dc.title The Relationship Between North Carolina Middle School Academic Growth And The Implementation Level Of Key Middle School Practices: A Study For Middle School Decision Makers en_US
dc.degree.name EdD en_US
dc.degree.level dissertation en_US
dc.degree.discipline Educational Leadership en_US


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