Factors Related to Motivation to Learn and Motivation to Transfer Learning in a Nursing Population

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Title: Factors Related to Motivation to Learn and Motivation to Transfer Learning in a Nursing Population
Author: Ayres, Helen Williams
Advisors: Carol Kasworm, Committee Chair
Abstract: This study tested the Ayres' model of factors influencing learner motivation in continuing professional education for nurses. The model was applied to nurses who participated in continuing professional education programs. Analyses of data included factor analyses, path analyses and model testing. Factor analyses examined the construct validity of the items in the constructs. Path analyses assessed the relationships of factors to motivation to learn and motivation to transfer. Model testing, using hierarchical regression techniques, evaluated the interactive effects among the factors in this study. Motivation to learn 1 contained outcomes related to gaining 1) a pay raise, 2) a promotion, 3) special recognition, 4) job security, 5) respect of boss, and 6) respect from peers. The variables of career utility and peer support showed a significant relationship to motivation to learn 1 in path analyses. In assessing for interactive effects of these variables (model testing), career utility was the only variable identified as significant in a hierarchical model of motivation to learn 1 (external factors). Motivation to learn 2 contained outcomes related to 1) gaining feelings of accomplishment, 2) improving self-confidence, 3) gaining greater job autonomy, and 4) improving job competence. Initial formal nursing education (negatively correlated), reason for attending the CPE program, previous CPE learning, previous CPE evaluation, job utility, career utility, and peer support all showed significant relationships to motivation to learn 2 in the path analyses. In assessing for interactive effects of these variables (model testing), previous CPE evaluation, career utility, initial formal nursing education (negatively correlated), highest formal nursing education, and the degree of advancement in formal nursing education (negatively correlated) were the variables identified as significant in a hierarchical model for motivation to learn 2 (internal factors). Path analyses identified a significant relationship between motivation to transfer and the key variables of 1) motivation to learn 1 and motivation to learn 2 (combined), 2) pre-training self-efficacy, 3) previous CPE evaluation, 4) job utility, 5) peer support, 6) post-training self-efficacy, and 7) reactions to the CPE program. Post-training selfefficacy and previous CPE learning (negatively correlated) had significant relationships with motivation to transfer in model testing.
Date: 2005-04-07
Degree: EdD
Discipline: Higher Education Administration
URI: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/3773


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