Children and Urban Neighborhoods: Relationships between Outdoor Activities of Children and Neighborhood Physical Characteristics in Dhaka, Bangladesh

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Title: Children and Urban Neighborhoods: Relationships between Outdoor Activities of Children and Neighborhood Physical Characteristics in Dhaka, Bangladesh
Author: Islam, Mohammed Zakiul
Advisors: Robin C. Moore, Committee Chair
Lynne Baker-Ward, Committee Member
Perver K. Baran, Committee Co-Chair
Charles R. Tittle, Committee Member
Abstract: Realizing the importance of children’s situation and special needs, on 20 November 1989 the United Nations adopted the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC). This is an international, legally binding instrument to incorporate children’s rights involving 190 countries of the world. Although 18 years have passed since the adoption of the CRC, the situation of children in general has not been alleviated as expected. This study aims to investigate the relationship between children’s outdoor activity and built environment in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The main aim was to identify specific built environment variables that are important for children’s outdoor activity. A two-stage sequential mixed method approach was carried out involving 109 children of primarily 10 to 12 years of age. Children’s outdoor activity was represented through two dependent variables: daily average time spent outdoors in a week and independent mobility. In total, 22 built environmental and 9 control (socio-demographic and perceptional) variables were included. The first stage used a correlational approach and collected quantitative data. Relationships between children’s outdoor activity and independent variables were subject to inferential statistical analysis. For the second stage, 46 children were convenience sampled from the initial 109 children of the first stage. The second stage collected qualitative data to provide interpretive depth to the findings obtained from the first stage’s statistical analysis. A number of significant findings identify relationships between built environment variables and children’s outdoor activity both at conceptual and practical levels. Significant relationships were found between specific built environment variables and children’s outdoor activities. Several findings are strikingly different from prior studies. There were six significant variables for daily average time spent outdoors in a week. They were gender, parent’s perception, road type (dead-end and through), availability of adjacent space, level of residence, and density of built forms in the neighborhood. Three significant variables were found for independent mobility. They were gender, age, parent’s perception, and density of built form in the neighborhood.
Date: 2009-11-26
Degree: PhD
Discipline: Design
URI: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/3963


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