Evaluation of Halosulfuron, Thifensulfuron, and Trifloxysulfuron Herbicides for their Use in Sweetpotato

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Title: Evaluation of Halosulfuron, Thifensulfuron, and Trifloxysulfuron Herbicides for their Use in Sweetpotato
Author: MacRae, Andrew Wayne
Advisors: Dr. David Monks, Committee Chair
Dr. John Wilcut, Committee Member
Dr. David Jordan, Committee Member
Dr. Jonathan Schultheis, Committee Member
Abstract: Studies were conducted to determine the safety of halosulfuron, thifensulfuron, and trifloxysulfuron on sweetpotato. Halosulfuron applied at 39 g ai/ha four weeks after transplanting was found to be safe on sweetpotato, with a yield reduction potential of only seven percent. The yield reduction may be a delay in crop maturity that may be recovered if harvest was delayed. Halosulfuron was tested on the cultivars 'Beauregard', 'Covington', 'Diane', 'Jewel', 'O'Henry', and 'Poinatta'. Halosulfuron from 13 to 65 g/ha applied four weeks after sweetpotato transplant did not reduce yield for any of the cultivars tested. Only 'Diane' was observed to have a yield reduction of ten percent when halosulfuron was applied two weeks after transplanting. Halosulfuron from 13 to 65 g/ha applied one and three days prior to transplant did not reduce yield of sweetpotato. Halosulfuron applied seven days prior to transplant reduced yield of sweetpotato. This reduction may be related to rainfall. The seven day pre-transplant treatment received more than 2.5 cm of rain after application. Halosulfuron may have leached into the root zone causing the reduction in yield. No reduction in yield was observed Thifensulfuron at 4.5 g/ha applied six or eight weeks after transplanting was found to be safe to sweetpotato and have a potential of yield reduction of only ten percent. Trifloxysulfuron from 1.1 to 8.5 g/ha is safe to apply to sweetpotato five weeks after transplant with only two percent possibility of yield reduction. The yield reduction for the thifensulfuron and trifloxysulfuron applications may be a delay in crop maturity that could be recovered by delaying harvest. Trifloxysulfuron applied one, three, and seven days prior to sweetpotato transplant did not reduce yield of sweetpotato. Halosulfuron was observed to have the smallest concentration of herbicide that inhibited the acetolactate synthase enzyme by fifty percent followed by primisulfuron, trifloxysulfuron, and nicosulfuron in increasing order. The use of this data for identifying tolerance in sweetpotato is not feasible since we already know from field trials that trifloxysulfuron is more likely to reduce sweetpotato yield than halosulfuron.
Date: 2005-08-09
Degree: PhD
Discipline: Horticultural Science
URI: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/4381


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