An Empirical Study Comparing the Effect of Feedback, Training, and Executive Coaching on Leadership Behavior Change

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Title: An Empirical Study Comparing the Effect of Feedback, Training, and Executive Coaching on Leadership Behavior Change
Author: Saling, Nona E.
Advisors: Tony O'Driscoll, Committee Member
Christie Mabry, Committee Member
Paula Berardinelli, Committee Co-Chair
Bart Craig, Committee Member
Brad Mehlenbacher, Committee Co-Chair
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in leadership behavior change of participants in feedback only (A), feedback and training (B), and feedback, training, and coaching (C) groups. Participants were 101 managers, supervisors, and team leaders from businesses and nonprofit organizations in the United States. Participants received 360-degree feedback twice, based on a 28-item feedback survey. Pre-test and post-test responses were subjected to an exploratory factor analysis, resulting in two factors: relationship (14 items) and task (7 items). Seven items were discarded from further analysis. These were analyzed separately in all statistical tests of difference. There were no significant differences between the change in relationship or task factor scores over time as measured by the interaction effect of group and test, when adjusted for the covariates of time and participant age. For the task factor, tests for effects of slices found highly significant differences in both pre-test and post-test scores. Tests of pre-test scores on the task factor showed a significant difference between the feedback only (A) group and the feedback, training, and coaching (C) group. Tests of post-test scores showed a trend toward a significant difference between the feedback only (A) group and the feedback and training (B) group. Preexisting differences among the training, feedback, and coaching (C) group on the task factor may have accounted for the differences found. Based on prior research, this group may be more at risk for derailment than the other two groups. Further research using exploratory factor analysis to identify the actual factors present in 360-degree feedback is recommended. Tests for differences between pre-tests and post-tests within each of the three groups showed trends that should be replicated in future research. Due to the small sample size of the study, results need to be interpreted with caution.
Date: 2005-12-06
Degree: EdD
Discipline: Adult and Community College Education
URI: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/4474


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