Fiber Length Measurement by Image Processing

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dc.contributor.advisor Jon P. Rust, Chair en_US
dc.contributor.advisor H. Joel Trussell, Member en_US
dc.contributor.advisor Robert A. Barnhardt, Member en_US
dc.contributor.advisor Warren J. Jasper, Member en_US
dc.contributor.author Ikiz, Yuksel en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-04-02T18:58:04Z
dc.date.available 2010-04-02T18:58:04Z
dc.date.issued 2000-08-10 en_US
dc.identifier.other etd-20000809-225316 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/4642
dc.description.abstract This research studied the accuracy and feasibility of cotton fiber length measurement by image processing as an alternative to existing systems. Current systems have some weaknesses especially in Short Fiber Content (SFC) determination, which is becoming an important length parameter in industry. Seventy-two treatments of five factors were analyzed for length and time measurements by our own computer program. The factors are: Sample preparation (without fiber crossover and with fiber crossover), lighting (backlighting and frontlighting), resolution (37-micron, 57-micron, 106-micron, and 185-micron), preprocessing (4-neighborhood and 8-neighborhood), and processing (outlining, thinning, and adding broken skeletons). The best results in terms of accuracy, precision and analysis time for images without fiber crossovers were: 106-micron resolution with frontlighting using an 8-neighborhood thresholding algorithm and using an outline algorithm for length determination. With fiber crossovers, 57-micron resolution with backlighting using an 8-neighborhood thresholding algorithm and using a thinning algorithm combined with an adding algorithm for combining broken skeletons. Using the above conditions, 1775 area can be analyzed using our current equipment in 15 seconds. In the case of images with crossovers, only 117 can be analyzed in 15 seconds. This research demonstrates that successful sample preparation without fiber crossovers would create the best fiber length measurement technique, however with fiber crossovers the system efficiency has been proven as well. en_US
dc.rights I hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to NC State University or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report. en_US
dc.title Fiber Length Measurement by Image Processing en_US
dc.degree.name PhD en_US
dc.degree.level PhD Dissertation en_US
dc.degree.discipline Fiber and Polymer Science en_US


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