Examination of the Interaction of Team Learning Variables Within a Systems Focus on Organizational Learning and the Learning Organization: A Study of a Nursing Team at a Large Southeastern Teaching Hospital

Show full item record

Title: Examination of the Interaction of Team Learning Variables Within a Systems Focus on Organizational Learning and the Learning Organization: A Study of a Nursing Team at a Large Southeastern Teaching Hospital
Author: Corpening, James L. Jr.
Advisors: Conrad Glass, Committee Member
John Pettitt, Committee Co-Chair
Tony O'Driscoll, Committee Co-Chair
Diane Chapman, Committee Member
Abstract: The purpose of this study is twofold. First, this study takes an exploratory approach into examining the interaction of the team learning variables contained in the Team Learning Survey developed by Dechant and Marsick (1993). The interaction of the variables was examined to give further insight into whether the variables individually, or in combination, add to the empirical base of understanding team learning theory. Secondly, this study employs an already established work team and analyzes whether the team learning variables are applicable to work and demographic variables (ethnicity, gender, salary, age, professional degree, work status, and nursing longevity). The team selected for analysis is nurses at ABC Hospital (pseudonym). This team was chosen because teamwork is fundamental to their work product, and they rely upon the knowledge of one another to provide care for patients. A multiple regression procedure was used to examine the interaction of five team learning variables: 1) team learning processes, 2) team learning conditions, 3) team learning outcomes, 4) organizational learning conditions, and 5) organizational learning contributions. A regression model indicated team learning processes, team learning conditions, and organizational learning contributions predict team learning outcomes. The model was able to explain 73 percent of the sample variation in team learning outcomes. However, the team learning processes variable alone explains 70 percent of the 73 percent sample variation. Additional analysis was conducted with respect to the team learning variables. ANOVA and Tukey procedures were used to determine if the team learning variables differ by ethnicity, gender, full- vs. part-time work status, age and salary. At a .05 level of significance, Asians scored higher than Caucasians on team learning conditions and African-Americans scored higher than Caucasians on organizational learning contributions. Spearman correlation was used to determine if a relationship exists among the team learning variables and demographic variables (nursing longevity, salary, and age). At a .05 level of significance, the team learning variables showed no relationship with the demographic variables.
Date: 2003-09-03
Degree: EdD
Discipline: Adult and Community College Education
URI: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/4896


Files in this item

Files Size Format View
etd.pdf 990.0Kb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record