Racial Identity Attitudes, Race-related Stress, Coping Strategies and Gender Among African American Students Attending Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUS)

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Title: Racial Identity Attitudes, Race-related Stress, Coping Strategies and Gender Among African American Students Attending Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUS)
Author: Newsome, Gwendolyn Keith
Advisors: Paul Bitting, Committee Member
Herbert Exum, Committee Member
Tracy L. Robinson, Committee Chair
Katherine Klein, Committee Member
Edwin Gerler, Committee Member
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among the dependent variables racial identity attitudes, race-related stress, and coping strategies in a sample of African American students attending Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUS). The study also investigated the influence of gender on these variables. A quantitative research design was used. The dependent measures used were the Cross Racial Identity Scale (CRIS:Vandiver, et al, 2001), the Coping Strategy Indicator (CSI: Amirkhan, 1990) and the Index of Race-Related Stress- Brief ( IRRS-B: Utsey, 1999). The independent measure, gender, was assessed using the demographic survey contained in the CRIS. This was a descriptive study that employed a passive correlation design to determine the presence or absence of relationships among study dependent variables using Pearson product moment correlation. The alpha level was set at .05. Additional GLM multiple analysis of variance and separate univariate analysis of variance were used to determine gender differences among racial identity, coping and race-related stress. The results indicated relationships between racial identity levels and race-related stress. There was evidence that participants with Internalization Multicultural Inclusive identities experienced more race-related stress than those in other racial identity statuses. Evidence also suggests African Americans use Avoidance to cope with race-related stress. Gender differences were found to exist in racial identity development and race-related stress. Women reported more Internalization Multicultural Inclusive racial identity. They also reported more race-related stress than the men in this study. Limitations to the study were noted. Implications from this study suggest counselors at HBCU's take assessments of racial identity development, race-related stress and gender issues as a part of initial screening for counseling services. Implications also suggest some African Americans may suffer from Posttraumatic Stress Disorder as a result of racial trauma. Finding suggest it is imperative that counselors provide African American students with outlets to address concerns in related to race-related stress, coping and racial identity. An intervention is examined for racial identity development. Suggestions for future research are also discussed.
Date: 2004-11-25
Degree: PhD
Discipline: Counselor Education
URI: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/4966


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