Dispositional Influences and Individual Differences in Work Performance: Relationships of Goal Orientation, Growth Need Strength, and Conscientiousness.

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Title: Dispositional Influences and Individual Differences in Work Performance: Relationships of Goal Orientation, Growth Need Strength, and Conscientiousness.
Author: Dierdorff, Erich Clinton
Advisors: Bob Pond, Committee Member
Paul Mulvey, Committee Member
Mark A. Wilson, Committee Chair
Bill Cunningham, Committee Member
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the roles of dispositional variables in affecting work performance. Study participants were criminal investigators from a state bureau of investigation (N = 158). The predictive potentials of growth need strength (GNS), learning orientation, performance orientation, and Conscientiousness were examined using structural equation modeling in relation to multidimensional work performance. All scales used for the study's constructs were subjected to a tetrad analysis prior to modeling in order to ensure unidimensional congeneric indicator sets. Three job performance constructs were incorporated: task performance as rating data, task performance as work activity data, and citizenship performance as rating data. GNS was shown to predict work activity task performance. Conscientiousness was found to predict citizenship performance. Learning orientation predicted both work activity task performance and citizenship performance, however the directions of the relationships were negative. Performance orientation was not found to predict any performance construct. None of the dispositional constructs predicted task performance as derived from ratings. Of the predictors, GNS and learning orientation displayed the highest latent correlation due to their similar conceptualizations. Using different operationalizations and sources for the latent performance criteria increased their measurement distinctiveness, as well as revealing differential predictive validities. The implications of these predictive validities and the importance of using a multidimensional approach to performance in future research are discussed.
Date: 2003-06-25
Degree: PhD
Discipline: Psychology
URI: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/5166


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