A Field Experimnet to Evaluate HIPP, A Conflict Resolution Process Curriculum, in an Urban Middle School Serving African American Students from a High Poverty, High Crime Neighborhood

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Title: A Field Experimnet to Evaluate HIPP, A Conflict Resolution Process Curriculum, in an Urban Middle School Serving African American Students from a High Poverty, High Crime Neighborhood
Author: Coggins, Copper MacKenzie
Advisors: Denis O. Gray, Committee Chair
Abstract: The preliminary sections of this work outline the history and theoretical basis of conflict resolution education (CRE). Extensive critical review of previous research reveals a need for an experimental program evaluation that measures substantive behavioral outcomes of CRE for middle school students. This need is addressed by undertaking a field experiment to evaluate a conflict resolution curriculum in a middle school serving African American students living in a high poverty, high crime urban neighborhood. Self-reported aggressive behavior and victimization are measured as well as knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy for non-violence. Results show that HIPP, the Help Increase the Peace Program, (developed by and available from the American Friends Service Committee POB 73008 Washington, DC 20056 or online at http://www.afsc.org/resources/items/hipp-manual.htm ) produced positive behavioral and process outcomes. At posttest, African American boys in the treatment group were significantly less likely to experience victimization by peers than African American boys in the control group (p < .05). There was also a significant (p < .05) positive effect of the HIP Program on boys self-efficacy for non-violence (confidence that they can use non-violent strategies to stay out of fights) compared with boys in the control group at posttest. Knowledge outcomes for students within the treatment group were positively related to the number of training workshops attended. The discussion addresses issues of measurement for evaluating conflict resolution education, including: sex differences in indicators of attitudes related to aggression and a conceptual shift in self-efficacy for non-violence between pre- and posttest.
Date: 2005-08-02
Degree: PhD
Discipline: Psychology
URI: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/5380


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