Can Factors Related to Self-Regulated Learning and Epistemological Beliefs Predict Learning Achievement in Undergraduate Asynchronous Web-Based Courses?

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Title: Can Factors Related to Self-Regulated Learning and Epistemological Beliefs Predict Learning Achievement in Undergraduate Asynchronous Web-Based Courses?
Author: Bell, Paul David
Advisors: Paul F. Bitting, Committee Co-Chair
Duane Akroyd, Committee Co-Chair
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of subfactors of self-regulated learning (SRL) and epistemological beliefs (EB) on individual learner levels of academic achievement in an asynchronous Web-based learning environment while holding constant the effect of three covariate factors: (a) self-efficacy for using computer technology, (b) reason for taking an online course, and (c) prior college academic achievement. The study population was comprised of 201 undergraduate students enrolled in a variety of asynchronous Web-based courses during the spring 2005 semester at a university in the southeastern region of the United States. Data was collected via a Web-based self-report questionnaire and subjected to the following analyses: (a) separate exploratory factor analyses were performed in order to determine the factor structures for the self-regulated learning and for the epistemological beliefs question items, (b) Pearson correlation coefficients describing the associations among the independent variables and between the independent variables and the dependent variable were compared, and lastly, (c) course grades were regressed on the linear combination of all the variables in the model. Analysis of the data revealed that while 5 of 11 independent variables were associated with the dependent variable (GPA, Expectancy, Effort regulation, Quick learning and GPA_Exp); only three (GPA, Expectancy, and GPA_Exp) were significant predictors in the linear predictive model of learning achievement in asynchronous online courses. Study findings were analyzed and reasons offered for why the predictive model of learning achievement in asynchronous online courses included only one self-regulated learning subfactor, no epistemological belief subfactors, and only one of the three covariate factors. Future research that looks at other factors affecting learner achievement and that employs other research methodologies, such as qualitative analysis, are warranted and would greatly add to the literature related to learning achievement in undergraduate asynchronous online environments.
Date: 2006-10-04
Degree: PhD
Discipline: Educational Research and Policy Analysis
URI: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/5792


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