Understanding Environmentally Significant Behavior Among Guides in the Garhwal Himalaya

Show full item record

Title: Understanding Environmentally Significant Behavior Among Guides in the Garhwal Himalaya
Author: Serenari, Christopher
Advisors: Dr. Aram Attarian, Committee Chair
Dr. Yu-Fai Leung, Committee Member
Dr. Gene Brothers, Committee Member
Dr. Keith Bosak, Committee Member
Abstract: A gap currently exists in research pertaining to the utility of low impact outdoor ethics in non-Western societies. Many non-Western societies rely on their own religious beliefs, cultural perceptions, and traditions to serve as the foundation for conservation and environmental protection and influence related behavior. This notion also includes guides, who have been identified as effective in altering client behavior and minimizing environmentally destructive behavior. Exploratory research was conducted in Garhwal, Uttarakhand, India in 2009 applying the Theory of Planned Behavior to identify those cognitive factors that lead whitewater and trekking guides to pack out trash, bury human waste, and cut living trees for firewood. Results suggest that the foundational constructs of the Theory of Planned Behavior are capable of predicting intention to perform pro-environmental behavior in a non-Western population of guides; however, their utility depends on the behavior performed. The implications of these results are discussed.
Date: 2010-04-22
Degree: MS
Discipline: Natural Resources
URI: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/6284


Files in this item

Files Size Format View
etd.pdf 1.623Mb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record