An Extension of the Intergroup Contact Theory: The Effects of Black-White Contact and Interracial Friendships on Whites' Racial Attitudes

Show full item record

Title: An Extension of the Intergroup Contact Theory: The Effects of Black-White Contact and Interracial Friendships on Whites' Racial Attitudes
Author: Macomber, Kristine Claire
Advisors: Donald Tomaskovic-Devey, Committee Member
Thomas J. Hoban, Committee Chair
Melvin Thomas, Committee Member
Abstract: Using data from the 1998 General Social Survey, this thesis examines the effects of black-white contact and close interracial friendships on whites' attitudes towards blacks. Intergroup contact theory maintains that contact between people of different groups reduces prejudices and improves attitudes. The majority of previous contact studies have focused on casual black-white contact in neighborhoods and workplaces. Emerging in the current literature is a focus on more personal contact between blacks and whites, as in close friendships. I hypothesize that a positive relationship exists between whites' having a close black friend and their attitudes towards blacks. I also hypothesize a positive relationship between contact and attitudes. I use OLS regression models to test both hypotheses. The results of the analysis support the second hypothesis. The key finding is a statistically significant positive effect of neighborhood contact on whites' attitudes towards blacks. In support of intergroup contact theory, this significant finding suggests that a necessary condition for contact effects on attitudes is equal status between blacks and whites.
Date: 2004-08-04
Degree: MS
Discipline: Sociology
URI: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/679


Files in this item

Files Size Format View
etd.pdf 98.38Kb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record