Technology Implementation in the Classroom

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dc.contributor.advisor Denis Gray, PhD, Committee Chair en_US
dc.contributor.advisor Jason Osborne, PhD, Committee Member en_US
dc.contributor.advisor Roger Mitchell, PhD, Committee Member en_US
dc.contributor.author Shattuck, Dominick en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-04-02T17:57:56Z
dc.date.available 2010-04-02T17:57:56Z
dc.date.issued 2006-05-26 en_US
dc.identifier.other etd-05182006-145752 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/721
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this research was to examine the relationship between teachers' attitudes toward technology and its implementation while their schools are undergoing a large-scale technology infusion in the state of North Carolina. The eleven treatment schools were selected through a grant writing procedure, high technology needs and Title I status. A detailed procedure was used to identify and recruit comparison schools. Treatment schools were provided with almost $1.5 million over three years to purchase educational technology, train their teachers and staff two full-time technology related positions: Media Coordinator and Technology Facilitator. In addition, schools were required to develop and integrate a Media Technology Advisory Committee (MTAC) to oversee planning and budgeting issues related to technology. Utilizing a quasi-experimental pre-post design, this study analyzed teacher attitude changes for treatment and comparison groups over year-one. Attitude and instructional practices were compared with pre-measure data to assess a baseline comparison of groups. Changes in group scores over time were conducted using RMANCOVA and differences were found between groups for two attitude subscales and for four instructional practices. The largest effect was found for technology implementation. Exploratory hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to assess the predictive relationship between attitude subscales and technology implementation. Only teachers' Affective Reaction to Computers had a significant relationship with Technology Implementation. en_US
dc.rights I hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to NC State University or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report. en_US
dc.subject attitudes en_US
dc.subject adoption of innovation en_US
dc.subject Title I en_US
dc.subject technology implementation en_US
dc.subject teachers en_US
dc.subject repeated measures en_US
dc.subject MANOVA en_US
dc.subject quantitative en_US
dc.subject constructivism en_US
dc.title Technology Implementation in the Classroom en_US
dc.degree.name MS en_US
dc.degree.level thesis en_US
dc.degree.discipline Psychology en_US


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