Bioavailability of PAHs in Aquatic Systems Using Passive Sampling: An Informative Piece

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Title: Bioavailability of PAHs in Aquatic Systems Using Passive Sampling: An Informative Piece
Author: Gilfillan, Dennis
Abstract: Abstract Bioavailability of PAHs in Aquatic Systems Using Passive Sampling: An Informative Piece. Dennis Gilfillan 2014 Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are persistent contaminants in the aquatic environment that can cause both acute and chronic health effects, and in some forms are determined to be carcinogenic. They also can bioaccumulate in organisms that exist in contaminated ecosystems through ingestion and diffusive transport systems. Traditional methods of assessment of bioavailability –that is, the amount that is readily available for biological uptake and to circulate in the system -­‐ requires grab sampling and solvent extraction methods that although quick and easy to perform can lead to over estimates of bioavailable concentrations. This can lead to conservative risk assessment with consequences in cost, delayed development of remediated sites, misidentified at risk sites, and misinterpreted information due to inaccuracies in the assessment. These traditional methods are countered with using passive samplers. These are based on diffusion uptake and once equilibrium is reached, a bioavailable concentration can be ascertained. These have been shown in the literature to be slower in attaining equilibrium, but have a benefit that the predicted concentrations are closer to actual bioaccumulated values in benthic organisms. With the use of performance reference compounds as well as site specific portioning coefficients and bioconcentration factors, estimates of risk due to contamination can be less conservative. The scope of this paper is to introduce passive samplers into the framework of modern risk assessment, review the previous literature on the subject of passive samplers use in both in-­‐situ and ex-­‐situ environments, and identify sources of future research to better assess bioavailability using passive samplers.
Date: 2014-12
URI: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.4/8567


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