Power Struggle in the Old Northwest: Why the United States Won and the Indians Lost the Indian War, 1786-1795

dc.contributor.advisorDr. Craig Thompson Friend, Committee Chairen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDr. Joe Caddell, Committee Memberen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDr. David Gilmartin, Committee Memberen_US
dc.contributor.authorKrieger, Brian Isaacen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-02T18:10:53Z
dc.date.available2010-04-02T18:10:53Z
dc.date.issued2008-03-25en_US
dc.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
dc.degree.levelthesisen_US
dc.degree.nameMAen_US
dc.description.abstractAfter the American Revolution, an influx of white settlers into the Old Northwest threatened to upset the balance of power that had existed in the region for decades. Various Indian tribes, frontiersmen, the United States government, and the British in Canada all sought to exercise military, economic, and political control over the Old Northwest. Flawed connections within and between groups who lacked the ability or willingness to compromise, shaped the brutal nature of the war and posed an obstacle to peace negotiations. Over the course of the conflict, internal power struggles weakened the western Indian confederacy and their British "allies." Contrarily, the ability of the federal government to improve relations with the frontier militias paved the way for an American victory at the Battle of Fallen Timbers, ensuring U.S. control of the region. After the Treaty of Greeneville, the inability of Indians and Americans to overcome their differences hampered assimilation, resulting in further native resistance and their forced removal westward. Studying the Indian War in terms of power shifts and relationships offers a thorough picture of this seminal conflict, while identifying how factors such as race, culture, and politics affected the war and its aftermath.en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-03192008-222628en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/2160
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dis sertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to NC State University or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectLittle Turtleen_US
dc.subjectSt. Clairen_US
dc.subjectWayneen_US
dc.subjectIndian Waren_US
dc.subjectOld Northwesten_US
dc.subjectpower struggleen_US
dc.subjectUnited Statesen_US
dc.subjectIndian confederacyen_US
dc.subjectHarmaren_US
dc.subjectBlue Jacketen_US
dc.titlePower Struggle in the Old Northwest: Why the United States Won and the Indians Lost the Indian War, 1786-1795en_US

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